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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 372 (some duplicates have been removed)
kabul years before. it just simply was too dangerous. it is still a dangerous place, by the way. i don't want to sound pollyannish here. things havent is changed for the better in afghanistan and the american people, sadly, don't know it. relative to the american by way ofy itself part of the story, of course, is the growth in the number of students. when it opened i think it with 53 students. there is now 1,000 students there. 300 of them are women. and they have a broad number of courses. i won't go into all those. on ann a a newd campus an international campus women's economic . defense dollars to open up a women's economic development school, a.i.d.?'t that why is it d.o.d.? significantly to the security of the country, but i think basically the answer is because the d.o.d. did a number of things including some of the commanders' expenditures which helped the development of that is so essential to its security and this is part of it. at thee story we got american university at a town meeting we had there is one hisdent we talked about life experience. when the taliban was there, he
think that it's always on the move, and our -- i don't know how much energy to spend on being offended by my lee cyrus thinking she's black. like, i don't know. [laughter] >> right. >> i absolutely agree. one of the things that drove me crazy. i didn't watch it, i don't care. i was sick of hearing about my lee cyrus. we have so much to do, stop wasting energy on this girl, what she's doing. i think that, you know, the cultural appropriation question is one that bothers us, absolutely, that cultures are, you know, they are borderless. i mean, we live right next to each other, always cultures informing and influencing each other, and you're right is that there's so much new produced that one of the things that black culture does is it is constantly on guard, constantly creating and recreating something new. you mentioned justin bieber and robin thicke, is it, you know, and this is what you can tell young people is it's tired. it's, you know, we listen to it and say that sounds like robin gaye, r and b30 years ago, so it's right that there is a constant mobility in moving in the
it is less likely we will need those judges so if you don't mind, if you don't mind i would ask if the educator's here would stand so the we may honor you properly for the bush -- the work that you do. [applause] >> and to be sure you are properly recognized, the head of my children's school is here with two of her colleagues. i don't know why you are hiding but we are glad you are here so that being said welcome to you both, we are happy to see you and you are heavily happy to be seen. i cannot forget it was year ago this week, a year ago this week that these terrible events occurred. it seems like a long time ago. doesn't it? >> i don't feel something has happened to me. when i think of malala yousafzai, there are pictures, and everything, i don't think that is me because i am feeling it. i am just a normal girl, and i am feeling powerful because after that incident, the people and the good wishes of people that people have sent me, in their prayers that have made me more powerful so i am really happy now and i don't feel like i was shot. >> one of the things i've learned from
that happen? because the picture is much, much better than that number. i just don't believe that the american people have had a fair or fuller picture of the events in afghanistan. i believe that the press has missed a good story. it hasn't missed the problems. it has missed the progress. the impression that our people get doesn't come from either. it comes from what they read or hear or see and what they have which is fair game. and they should be brought into the light and disclosed and written about and talked about. but what has been missing, i believe, is the part of the afghan story which represents real progress so that the american people have been deprived, denied the sense of success or at least partial success which i believe they are entitled to because of the loss of blood and treasure by our people. i think it is a sad -- it is sad that our people don't have that sense that hey, we have made some progress in afghanistan. the picture basically has just been too one-sided focused just too much on failure and on discord. to leave you now have to decide what we are going to do, what
with the members of the political elite in afghanistan and of course there are many things they do that they don't tell me about. but i have observed a huge change in the past 13 years in their relations with each other something which isn't often commented on 13 years ago they didn't know each other. their relations were yelling at each other over the radio. now including the people who are political, they all know each other and have worked together. prior to the election all of the candidates were running with each other and met each other extensively to talk about the rules for the game and how to resolve it and i'm confident that however disputed the outcome may be those people with their relations with each other and the right international support will be able to find some kind of a settlement even if many of them were not that happy with it. we have a lot of experts in this audience, which is great. >> thank you barbara and to the panel. i have a two-part question the first one directed to fatemeh talking about the pakistan iran pipeline. there have been concerns if and when the pipeline
don't see that happening either. so what we will see is fits and starts on certain things pakastani leaders will be cooperative and others they won't. >> rose: we conclude this evening with pavel khodorkovsky, the son of the former russian billionaire now in prison. >> my father sees himself as a person who went back to russia out of principle. he knew perfectly well that he would be arrested. he sees himself as a person who went to jail because of his convictions. whether in the long-term it is going to be perceived as one of the dissident, dissident stories is going to be up to seat. >> rose: u.s. politics, pakastani politics and russian politics when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >> captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we stand here tonight showing that it is possible to put doing your job first, to put working together first, to fight for what you believe in yet still stand by your principles and get something done for the people who elected you. >> rose: so we had electio
, and they may be right, they may be wrong but i would say that i don't trust any experts. and that's just my professional constitution. i'm hopeful often that once i do the research myself, and once i go to try to back it up, that i can demonstrate that that person was right. but i never take anyone's word, intel of done my own reporting. >> -- until i've done my own reporting. >> i just wanted to say, i spent an entire night last week reading nina's book cover to cover completely mesmerized. and it's hard to mesmerized at that level, especially given the way and and my background. >> who are you? >> my name is -- i have spent a great amount of my life so far on these issues, and when i started reading nina's book i was very effort. my heart was pounding because i could tell how fair she was trying to be and i was like, is jeffrey sachs going to get away with this? to me it's not a matter of jeffrey sachs. it's beyond him. it's an entire thinking class of people who never ever would ever imagine in the minds but africans, just like anyone else, are no different than anyone else. the only way
out of five people don't think politicians are getting anything done. >> even when they try their basic task, passing a budget they can't do that and it costs the government $24 billion by shutting down the government so they can't do the basic job so people have looked for somebody who can do something and when you listen to what christi said he didn't mention one specific policy mention, he mentioned hurricane sandy which is a special case but he didn't mention about the item, he just said i get things done and that message, you know, they didn't want to clutter it, that's the message they are trying to get across so that thirsty country will hear something that they can take away from it. >> rose: nor did he suggest it was a victory for moderates. >> he clearly said i am a conservative. >> that's right. now -- >> rose: i have to get through the republican pry may. >> a week ago he wouldn't have said that, a week ago he was happy to be smeared with the moderate label, now he is a conservative, but what is he really? well, you know, he is pro-life, he is against same sex m
, wait a minute our president is getting attacked on his healthcare plan we don't like that so in fact support among democrats has gone up and so in the virginia race one of the things that may have happened is democrats thought, no, this is going to be a referendum on obamacare, we want to defend it so we are going to get out there and vote. >> rose: the president's very low approval ratings, dipping a little bit lower which is about where george w. bush was near the end. >> that's right. and he also -- so the gallup daily track a lot of people quibble about gallup's method but dropped to 39 which is that important, below 40 number but also in the wall street journal, latest wall street journal poll the personal approval ratings were upside down for a long time people, their feelings about his job in office have been going down, but they always thought he was a pretty good guy n is a change. when in the wall street journal poll now more people don't like him than do like him and that is a problem. because thatersonal likability had kind of been holding him up as much as he had been he
convenient. when it happens people say we were lucky and when they don't. it's terrible timing. it's never a good time for an earthquake. >> but we are going to have one. >> how about the ground swallowing people into the ground? >> like the earth that collapsed? it's not like the tv shows. >> the earth does move and it bumps up and you get a ground fracture but it's not something that opens up and sucks you up into haddes. >> it's not going anywhere. we are going to have a lot of damage, but this myth that california is going to the ocean is not real. >> southern california is moving north. it's coming up from the south to the north. >> you would have to invest the million year cycle, not weeks or years. maybe millions of years from now, part of los angeles will be in the bay area. >> for better or worse. >> yes. >> this is a tough question. >> those other ones weren't tough. >> this is a really easy challenge. are the smaller ones less stress? >> yes. the amount released in small earthquakes is that they are so small in you need many of those. >> i think would you probably have to hav
-- >> if you don't mind, united states is an ally that is helping pakistan's economy, and it ease war against terrorism, but it is an enemy in the case of drones killing innocents. and then we with have same say they were never our friends and never will be. and then first world says pakistanis from an international rate society of religious extremists. i want to get your comments on this, the founder of the terrorist group, openly hosts popular rallies. bin laden was found a mile from military come pound, and many people say that pakistan government is harboring extremists. so what is your response so the contention that it is the drone strikes in. >> well, look, i think the drone strikes are on -- i agree with her in a narrow sense. drone strikes have increasingly taken to united states to difficult territory, in the feelings with pakistan. because now it is the case of the parliament of pakistan, the prime minister, and i think some significant portion think that it is a violation of their territorial sovereignty, whereas in the past we had private arrangements to continue this, now i thin
. one is whether corporationses have this right and, secondly, if they don't, as corporations, can the individual owners assert freedom of religion claims? by the way, on hobby lobby, they don't say we reject the entire contraceptive mandate. what they say is four elements of it. four things. two versions of the morning after pill, two kinds of iuds they say would be tantamount to abortion, so they don't want to provide coverage for them. but, you're right. it's a question the supreme court has never before addre addressed. does a for profit corporation, can it object to a federal law based on religious freedom? it's never answered that before, so that's one of the reasons why this is a big teal. >> yeah, a very big deal if they haven't answered it. and when you talk to obama administration officials and the folks at the justice department, they feel they went out of their way to exempt purely religious nonprofit institutions. they really wanted to leave some space for them and that goes to the question that you always lack at in these oral arguments is the justices want to know wh
all of these technological assets and human assets, we're not there, we don't know, and i think there is a lot of room for error. >> you can see robert greenwald's film in its entirety at the website unmanned.warcosts.com. i urge you to watch it with a companion because you will want to talk about the questions it raises concerning national security, drones, and the nature of war. then i'd like to know what you think. remember that in the excerpt we showed earlier the former drone operator says, "this is what we do, we kill people and break things, this is what our job is." it's true. once we insist on war as a solution, this is always the outcome. there is no way to avoid killing the innocent when you've determined to destroy your enemy. our own government has fought our wars by dropping atomic bombs on whole cities. by firebombing. carpet-bombing. by spreading the poison of agent orange over the homes and farms of noncombatants. by splashing burning napalm on children. in this war on terror, we're told either we put boots on the ground and see our own young men and women kille
can remember his left hand has been clinched its east the new renters don't see us until smooth. as a gift to you and he said calderon to scorching all healed the scheme is a knowledge and earthy clear of scott's team. he longed for his team a two pt school and has been reconstructed. today he's about to discover he has seen its like everyone else. thus the awe. they didn't lose him how he begins his fingers stuck together and now that separates the sydney seat i'm thrilled. i mean what you see he seemed to be happy stories like the pieces on the africa mercy. multiple claims that day. mike nights he says the ship's managing director are good reasons to believe police worry one day this is the word either the gala. inside we find some of the country's most desperate patients. towards welcome people with pastor wright's club feet. hauritz and deformities. he'll suffer from health problems really see in the works. the actual book anemone i say and you have value were glad to hear in smiling at him. and then take the lead someone has had one of these conditions are quite visible. b
, you've got to get the politics right. it's the reason people walk away from politics. they don't want to participate. don't want to watch. don't want to hear about it. but you can't, because in the end you've got to get it right. i'll give you one example. you can have the most efluorescent and sophisticate of cultures, and if you get the politics wrong, everything gets swept away-- germany, 1933, china during the cultural revolution. you don't have to go back into history. north korea today, the south has gotten the politics right. people live there -- >> rose: and the economics. >> right. -- in prosperity and in freedom. the north has gotten it tragically, horribly wrong. it's in the grip of a mad kind of stalinism. as a result, people are enslaved and society is a spiritual and material desert. that's what happens. and that's why even though i really enjoyed the practice of medicine and i believe to this day it's one of the most noble hendefers anybody can engage-- endeavors anybody can engage in, i left it because i thought everything in the end is going to hinge on politics. i wa
that they won. they didn't. we don't live in a capitalistic system we live in a corporate system. we don't live in a country that is fully socially conservative. we live in a country that is living on social issues. we understand that upheld at all that we have to fight and really centering on president obama as he is the bad guy. imagine her a moment that obama were impeached as so many conservatives seem to want. joe biden takes over. how is joe biden different than barack obama in any way even that he's less competent than the current president? joe biden has the same policy deceptions and sodas for the reclaimed him. so i think there is a broad movement that has to be fought. on the republican side, there are a lot of interesting candidates. an interesting guy, ron paul also i disagree with him strenuously on his foreign policy. allen west is an interesting night. his image matters. allen west is somebody that cuts an interesting figure for the republican party. there's other folks. mike pence of indiana. he's kind of laid low so far but i'm hoping he will throw his hat in the ring. one thi
"we don't talk about this." it was shocking and sad. and you had a ten-year period of successful books before the censorship kicked in. wasn't it the '80s that you began to see-- 1980 was--was-- yes, yes. but there had been some. i mean, there was a woman who called me after are you there god? it's me margaret. was published. she just looked me up in the phone book, and she said, "are you the one who wrote that book?" and i was really excited, and i said, "yes." and she called me a communist, and she hung up. so, you know, there we are. well, your experiences were markedly different from the experiences surrounding a book called nappy hair. and we've got a copy of it here, because this--this author was under attack. but more directly, a teacher was under attack. yes. and one of those wonderful stories that the author runs to the rescue. could you talk a little bit about nappy hair, what the book's about, and how you first heard about, kind of, the outrage directed towards this book? yes, the book actually started out as a recording of my uncle richard telling the story of my own nappy
that we don't expect those numbers to be very high and we never did. henry is at the white house with our report. reporter: embarrassed over the rollout of president obama signatureomestic achievement that only six people signed up on day one and was criticized by congressman darrell issa. >> there are no doubt there from a contractor about figures. if the website wasn working on october 1, that is a dog bites man story i said demanded to know why a parade of tp officials including kathleen sebelius did not give the information. >> if you have internal numbers and you're not willing to hear extra numbers, you are doing the kind of propaganda that this administration has done since day one. reporter: they say it will take a couple of weeks to nail down the details. >> why don't you put out a reasonable preliminary number and show us some transparency. >> we have a reasonable and accurate number as we promised we would on a monthly basis, consistent with the data release that you see other programs. the focus here is understandable on how low the number might be. reporter: jay carney said t
these problems. well he should have known. frankly, i don't believe for a moment that he didn't know. no less than nbc indicated that the president knew three years ago that everything he was saying at the podium, if you like your health insurance you can keep it. he knew that wasn't true. if he had explained that more people would lose their insurance than would keep it and that this program will put more people on medicaid than on private insurance, this thing would never have passed. i think a lot of democrats are going to be scrambling for the exits between now and election time next year. >> governor, because many people are discovering that the rollout is plagued with dysfunction, having an adverse impact in their own immediate lives, can the president get away with simply saying that he didn't know about the potential problems with the rollout ahead of time? i know you say you don't believe he didn't know. as he continues to say that he didn't know or wasn't aware about these issues, what does it do to his credibility? because this is a kind of answer he's been giving about issues like
two months before an election and if you don't think that's true, you don't understand how the interaction of economics and politics work. >> rahm, i'm just stunned you're not a more forgiving person. >> i am on a one-on-one basis. i'm very forgiving of you. i was locked in a room with you for 48 hours. >> senator, let's talk about what happens with bipartisanship at midnight. take us inside the room. >> can i say, judd, you had your own view of your house colleagues where you know full well -- forget the leadership -- they were not leading their members to a yes vote to defend the economy and you had your own views where you realized they were not holding up their side of the bargain even if some of them like roy blunt wanted to. >> i have plausible deniability on that issue. >> i know the story, it's in hank's book, maybe you can retell it for a second. you're in the room. it's close to midnight. you might be there, too. i think barney's there. >> barney was, and so was rahm. >> all of you. >> i would like the deniability now. >> this was at sort of the crux. this was the
with kmart free layaway don't let the holidays sneak up on you. and get 5% off toys when you put them on layaway. kmart. get in. get more christmas. average. we'lltalk about a milder set up to finish out the week coming up. . >>> [inaudible] this story is getting weirder by the minute. new video of of ritchey incognito in a profanity laced tirade while out with his teammates president this video shows him shouting the n word and other words. tmz says the video was shot at a team outinger in the year. ritchey >>> new developments tonight in that shooting inside new jersey's largest mall. we toldyou the story as breaking news last night. >> and neighbors remember the gunman as a helpful man but investigators believe the 20- year old wanted to end his life in a dramatic way. theysay he killed himself with a 22 22-caliber rifle he took from his brother. he fired rounds inside the mall. >>> a teacher wounded in that deadly shooting at lax says he crawled for his life and used a sweatshirt as a tourniquet. abullet hit his calf and shattered a bone. he says hewas hit and collapsed again
don't know. but i think where allies are close tapping private phones of their's particularly of the leader, the leader is what i'm talking about has much more political liability than probably intelligence viability. and i think we ought to look at it carefully. i believe the president is doing that and there are some exceptions. >> schieffer: do you think that the national security agency has gone too far? >> well, let me say something about the nsa. i believe the nsa is filled with good patriotic people who want to do the right thing. they follow the orders they're given. the administration controls intelligence. the national intelligence framework is put together by the administration. it begins with the director of national intelligence, it goes to the white house, it's the president, it's the nsc the cabinet and then the framework is formed. now, what happens is, people add to it, state wants this, department of state wants to know this. or somebody else wants to know that. priorities are ranked. as i understand it these are the priorities. one, terrorism. two, support
. >> what were they for halloween? what were their costumes? >> oh, oh. jack was the red ranger. you don't have boys, so you don't understand. mighty morphine power rangers. kate was a black cat. >> cute, cute. >> if a black cat is timeless. liam? >> he was a pumpkin. >> did you make the pumpkin? >> i did not. >> did you cry? >> i might have cried. i cry a lot. >> why did you cry? >> it's so cute. >> max was going to be a hockey player, but he decided to be a red sox. my daughter was a detective. bennett, we put him in a spiderman outfit. >> what did grow as? >> a financier. >> a motorcycle commercial. >> i louisville that. >> okay. that's great. >> what is cute walking up the upper east side yesterday about 6:00 and seeing these kids in their costume. for those of us out of that. >> i can see you putting the candy out the door and walking away. >> we live on the ninth floor of the building with no trick or treating. >> that's just cold. >> sad, right? >> scrooge is what it is. >> let's keep going. i don't want to do the obama care story. >> we missed you yesterday. it was incredible wat
'll contact you don't talk about what freedom charity. off to buy had received a call from winning side to go by with dana held against their will but an address in london for more than thirty years. for further investigation. we were able to identify the house with light were being held. with the help of sins to confess negotiations contacted for the charity three women. eight sixteen o one year old from malaysia fifty seven year old from islands. and it fits the role which each woman. roll rescued. new polls for a woodland walk slightly traumatized and what i can see places like that. with light green eye. now the acp scorsese human trafficking unit says he's never seen anything of this magnitude before. so i expect our correspondent in london they didn't expect you and you tell me the women discovered a few days ago. you'd be hoping to be revealed on how that applies to cool. i'm just a few weeks again and it was actually a result of a report on british television that the nra a team. but we can tell that to a breaking news story on the other three women full report on which tv which that
be called the bob beckel dating network. >> don't forget to dvr this show. see you back here tomorrow. >>> the other nuclear option. the president strikes a deal with iran. but even some of his democratic allies fear it could blow up in his face. this is "special report." >>> good evening. i'm bret baier. it's difficult to find anyone outside the white house who has many good things to say tonight about an agreement easing sanctions on iran in exchange for a short pause in its nuclear program. but there are plenty of naysayers, even in the president's own political corner. james rosen tells us from the white house who is for it and why so many are against it. >> reporter: during a west coast speech on immigration, president obama defended the nuclear deal the u.s. and its allies made over the weekend with iran. >> tough talk and bluster may be the easy thing to do politically, but it's not the right thing for our security. >> reporter: under terms finalized saturday in seven-nation talks, iran has agreed for six months to enrich uranium only to the 5% level or lower to dilute its spok
in the nation to change the outcome of decisions and rubber stamp the administration's expansive policies, i don't know what else you'd call it other than court packing. >> that is correct. nominations for empty court seats are tantamount to jamming the judicial branch. not only does this republican obstruction create havoc, it has the added bonus of undermining constitutional authority of the president of the united states. in reality, if anyone is court packing, it's actually senate republicans. writes salon, republicans are denying or threatening to deny confirmation to any nominees in order to nullify laws, stymy legitimate policymaking and reverse pac, keep liberal judges off one key appellate court in order to conserve its conservative balance for as long as possible. joining me today senior writer for "politico" magazine glen thrush, host of disrupt karen finney and writer from the "washington post" sam stein. wonderful people. thank you for joining me this friday of fridays. glen has more time with these slacky magazine deadlines. >> packed the court. >> we have talked. i think there's n
was too dangerous. it is still a dangerous place, by the way. i don't want to sound pollyanna here. i don't want to underestimate the difficulties. my main point is that things have changed significantly for the better in afghanistan and the american people sadly don't know it. american itself, part of the the university itself. it started with 53 student 300idate is now at 1000 and of them are women. they have a broad number of courses. new just recently opened a campus in a center for economic women development established ith the department of defense would love to make that off the record that i can't. i'm sure some of my colleagues are wondering why we are using department of defense dollars to open up a women's economic element school. why is that not usaid binstead of d.o.d? it adds to the security of the country but the answer is, basically, the dod does a number of things including the expenditures which help the development of that country which is so essential to the security. , the town meeting that i had there, one student who talked about his life experience when the taliban
thank you all for coming. we don't want to break the microphone. it's a nice, cold, clear day in washington and i think it's the same in geneva, and i had trouble tearing myself away from twitter this once i hope that there is news from their you will, someone who is on twitter here in the audience will let us know. clearly there is a connection, however, between what is going on in geneva and what is happening here. if there is a nuclear agreement, if there's an improvement in relations between the united states and iran, between iran and the western community in general, that is going to have an impact on iran's role in the region. and we are focusing today on iran and its eastern neighbors, specifically afghanistan, pakistan and india. while iran is often considered a middle eastern country, in fact, it's historically its cultural ties are as strong if not stronger with its eastern neighbors, with afghanistan and south asia. and, of course, iran will be a pivotal player as it has been all along in afghanistan, especially next year as the united states and nato began to with
in the philippines. >> we don't have homes. homes, we need shelter, food, light. >> the historic typhoon haiyan wipes communities off the map as relief slowly arrives. >>> speaking out. accused of harassment and suspended from the miami dolphins, richie incognito starts to tell his side of the story. >> the way jonathan and the rest of the offensive line and our teammates, how we communicate, it's vulgar. it's not right. >> reporter: now the question -- when will we hear from jonathan martin? >>> sky scraper dispute. which tower is america's tallest? the world trade center in new york or the willis tower in chicago? which city will get the bragging rights after a big decision. it is monday, november 11th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller an diana perez. >> good morning everyone. veterans's day. >> happy veteran's day to our veterans out there. let's get started once again. we begin with the latest challenges following the devastating storm in the philippines. the u.n. is sending supplies, but access was nearly impossible because the infrastructure is destroyed. >
the people think you did the right thing. if they don't, that's the way it goes. [applause] >> i like your take on what we see as the shift in the wealth of the country to be very, very tiny percentage it's only gotten worse and worse and worse since reagan, the republican god. we see our discussion of us socials purity as an example for the wealthiest to impose any proposal to eliminate that cap. what could he do when the wealthiest have the power to create a tea party was founded with coke money. >> let's not distract from the myth of the grassroots movement at the tea party professes to be. corporate infused, no question. >> how can we trust those things? if we don't, we'll end up like some of the countries that did very well be an increasingly rebellious disenfranchised majority? >> i think your faith should have been restored with the reelection of president obama last year. and here is why. because that election between mitt romney and barack obama presented to vary this gene to clear paths down which americans could choose to go. the path of the republicans in the tea party extremis
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 372 (some duplicates have been removed)